Today in Labor History May 18th

In what may have been baseball’s first labor strike, the Detroit Tigers refuse to play after team leader Ty Cobb was suspended after he went into the stands and beat a fan who had been heckling him. Cobb was reinstated and the Tigers went back to work after the team manager’s failed attempt to replace … Read moreToday in Labor History May 18th

Today in Labor History May 15th

Pope Leo XIII issued the revolutionary encyclical Rerum novarum in defense of workers and the right to organize. Forty years later to the day, Pope Pius XI issued Quadragesimo anno, believed by many to be even more radical than Leo XIII’s. – 1891 The Western Federation of Miners formed in Butte, Montana by Big Bill Haywood.  They organized … Read moreToday in Labor History May 15th

Today in Labor History May 9th

A coal mine exploded at Roslyn, Washington killing 45 mine workers. – 1892 Striking tram workers blew up a tramcar during riots in St. Louis. – 1900 Japanese workers struck at Oahu, Hawaii’s Aiea Plantation, demanding the same pay as Portuguese and Puerto Rican workers. Ultimately 7,000 workers and their families remained out until August … Read moreToday in Labor History May 9th

Today in Labor History – March 23rd

101 Wobblies (members of the Industrial Workers of the World, IWW) went on trial in Chicago for opposing World War I. They were tried for violating the Espionage Act. In September 1917, 165 IWW leaders were arrested for conspiring to subvert the draft and encourage desertion. Their trial lasted five months, the longest criminal trial in American history up to that … Read moreToday in Labor History – March 23rd

Today in Labor History – February 17th

Florence Kelley “Big Bill” Haywood and two others were arrested (kidnapped) for the murder of former Idaho Governor Frank Steunenberg. Clarence Darrow successfully defended them, telling jurors, “If at the behest of this mob you should kill Bill Haywood, he is mortal, he will die, but I want to say that a million men will … Read moreToday in Labor History – February 17th

Today in Labor History – February 4th

Big Bill Haywood The Ohio legislature authorized construction of the 249-mile Miami and Erie Canal to connect Toledo to Cincinnati. Local historians said “Irish immigrants, convicts and local farmers used picks, shovels and wheelbarrows,” at 30 cents per day, to construct the 249-mile-long waterway. – 1825 The International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing … Read moreToday in Labor History – February 4th