Today in Labor History September 18th

Textile workers went on a General Strike on the east coast, with 325,000 striking in the south and 421,000 striking nationwide. 1.5 million struck in various industries. – 1934 The Teamsters for a Democratic Union (TDU)  was formally founded at an Ohio convention during a period of serious corruption in the union. Two years earlier … Read moreToday in Labor History September 18th

Today in Labor History September 17th

The Allegheny Arsenal exploded, killing seventy-five workers, including 43 women—the worst industrial accident associated with the Civil War. – 1862 At a New York convention of the National Labor Congress, Susan B. Anthony called for the formation of a Working Women’s Association. As a delegate to the Congress, she persuaded the committee on female labor … Read moreToday in Labor History September 17th

Today in Labor History September 16th

Members of the Fruit and Vegetable Workers’ Union blocked downtown Salinas, California streets to stop a convoy of trucks carrying produce harvested by strikebreakers. – 1936 43,000 oil workers went on strike in 20 states, immediately after World War II ended. The end of the war saw a wave of strikes across the country, as … Read moreToday in Labor History September 16th

Today in Labor History September 15th

5,000 female cotton workers in and around Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania went on strike for a 10-hour day. Hundreds of “factory girls” and male supporters from Allegheny City and Pittsburgh marched on the Blackstock mill, one of the largest in the area. There, the women broke down the factory’s pine gates and forcibly expelled the “scab girls” … Read moreToday in Labor History September 15th

Today in Labor History September 14th

The Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel, and Tin Workers union called off an unsuccessful 3-month strike against U.S. Steel Corporation subsidiaries. – 1901 Gastonia, North Carolina textile mill striker and songwriter Ella Mae Wiggins, 29 and mother of nine, was killed when local vigilantes, thugs and a sheriff’s deputy forced the pickup truck in which … Read moreToday in Labor History September 14th

Today in Labor History September 13th

The Post Office Department ordered 25,000 railway mail clerks to shoot to kill any bandits attempting to rob the mail. – 1926 Three workers died during a strike in Woonsocket, Rhode Island, fighting for a minimum wage for textile workers. Over the course of September, more than 420,000 workers joined the strike. – 1934 One … Read moreToday in Labor History September 13th

Today in Labor History September 12th

Somewhere on or around this date, the first African-American trade union called the Colored Caulkers’ Trade Union Society of Baltimore was founded, with Isaac Myers as the union’s first president. – 1866 Eugene V. Debs, labor leader and socialist, was sentenced to 10 years for opposing World War I.  On June 16, 1918, Debs had … Read moreToday in Labor History September 12th

Today in Labor History September 11th

75,000 coal miners in Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia ended a 10-week strike after winning an 8-hour day, semi-monthly pay and the abolition of overpriced company-owned stores where they had been forced to shop. (Remember the song, “Sixteen Tons,” by coal miner’s son Merle Travis, in which there’s this line: “I owe my soul to … Read moreToday in Labor History September 11th

Today in Labor History September 10th

Polish, Lithuanian, German and Slovak miners were gunned down by the Latimer Mine’s sheriff deputies during a peaceful march from Hazelton to Latimer, leaving 19 dead and more than 50 wounded.   Some 3,000 were marching for collective bargaining and civil liberty.  The shooters were tried for murder but the jury failed to convict.  – 1897 … Read moreToday in Labor History September 10th

Today in Labor History September 9th

In convention at Topeka, Kansas, delegates created the Brotherhood of Railway Carmen of America. The men who repaired the nation’s rail cars were paid 10 or 15¢ an hour, working 12 hour days, often seven days a week. – 1890 The first strike by African-American plantation workers occurred on this date in Georgia and Arkansas. … Read moreToday in Labor History September 9th