Today in Labor History November 9th

Thirty people, including at least nine firefighters, were killed in Boston’s worst fire. It started at 7:20 pm in the basement of a commercial warehouse at 83-87 Summer Street. The fire was finally contained 12 hours later, after it had consumed about 65 acres of Boston’s downtown, 776 buildings and much of the financial district, … Read moreToday in Labor History November 9th

Today in Labor History November 8th

20,000 black and white workers launched a General Strike in New Orleans. In the wake of the streetcar drivers’ labor victory earlier in the year in which they won a closed shop and shorter workday, a massive organizing campaign led to the creation of dozens of new unions and greater demands from the city’s workers. … Read moreToday in Labor History November 8th

Today in Labor History November 7th

Ernest Riebe’s “Mr. Block,” IWW labor comic strip first appeared in print. Mr. Block was one of the best-loved features in the Wobbly press. Joe Hill wrote a song about “Mr. Block”, who was a boss-loving, American Dream-believing, self-sabotaging knucklehead. Some call Riebe the first underground comic book artist. – 1912 Some 1,300 building trades workers … Read moreToday in Labor History November 7th

Today in Labor History November 5th

Eugene V. Debs was born on this day. He was a labor leader, socialist, five-time candidate for president, and first president of the American Railway Union.. “The Republican and Democratic parties, or to be more exact, the Republican-Democratic party, represent the capitalist class in the class struggle. They are the political wings of the capitalist system … Read moreToday in Labor History November 5th

Today in Labor History November 4th

Populist humorist Will Rogers was born on this day near Oologah, Indian Territory (later Oklahoma). One of his many memorable quotes: “I belong to no organized party. I am a Democrat.” – 1879 3,000 dairy farmers demonstrated in Neillsville, Wisconsin, ultimately leading to the freeing of jailed leaders of a milk strike over low prices … Read moreToday in Labor History November 4th

Today in Labor History November 3rd

California Workingmen’s Party orator Dennis Kearney was arrested and jailed for two weeks for “incendiary speeches.” – 1887 Striking milk drivers dumped thousands of gallons of milk on New York City streets. – 1921 A United Mine Workers strike that led to a U.S. government takeover of the mines ended on this date with a … Read moreToday in Labor History November 3rd

Today in Labor History November 2nd

The IWW (Industrial Workers of the World) free-speech fight in Spokane, Washington began on this date. Local organizer James P. Thompson was yanked from the speaker’s platform by the police. Other Wobblies swarmed to take his place, leading to the arrests of 150 men and women. The IWW union hall was also raided. –  1909 Labor leader Eugene V. Debs received … Read moreToday in Labor History November 2nd

Today in Labor History November 1st

Workers in Philadelphia organized a successful general strike for a 10-hour workday. Three hundred armed Irish longshoremen marched through the streets calling workers to join them on strike. 20,000 leather workers, printers, carpenters, bricklayers, masons, city employees, bakers, clerks, and painters joined in. Within a week, the city government announced a 10-hour workday for its … Read moreToday in Labor History November 1st

Today in Labor History October 31st

George Henry Evans published the first issue of the Working Man’s Advocate, “edited by a Mechanic” for the “useful and industrious classes” in New York City. He focused on the inequities between the “portion of society living in luxury and idleness” and those “groaning under the oppression and miseries imposed on them”. – 1829 Convict laborers … Read moreToday in Labor History October 31st