Today in Labor History November 28th

William Sylvis was born on this day. Sylvis is best remembered as a founder of the Iron Molders’ International Union and the National Labor Union, the latter being one of the first American union federations attempting to unite workers of various crafts into a single national organization. – 1828 The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers … Read more Today in Labor History November 28th

Today in Labor History November 27th

1,200 workers sat down at Midland Steel, forcing recognition of the United Auto Workers in Detroit, Michigan. – 1936 . Rehearsals were held at night and on weekends, and performances were all on Fridays and Saturdays to appease their bosses (i.e., in order to keep their jobs). It ran for 1,108 performances before closing. In … Read more Today in Labor History November 27th

Today in Labor History November 26th

Four months before the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, six young women burned to death and 19 more died when they leapt from the fourth-story windows of a blazing factory in Newark, New Jersey. The floors and stairs were wooden; the only door through which the women could flee was locked. The fire made national news … Read more Today in Labor History November 26th

Today in Labor History November 25th

10,000 New Orleans workers, black and white, participated in a solidarity parade of unions comprising the Central Trades and Labor Assembly. The parade was so successful it was repeated the following two years. – 1883 A strike for union recognition by 395,000 steelworkers continued throughout November. The strike began on September 22 and collapsed on … Read more Today in Labor History November 25th

Today in Labor History November 24th

The United Cigar Makers of New York affiliated with the Cigar Makers’ International Union (CMIU) to form CMIU Local 144. Samuel Gompers was elected the first president of the local and served several terms before going on to serve as the international’s vice president. “[W]e are powerless in an isolated condition”, Gompers said, “while the … Read more Today in Labor History November 24th

Today in Labor History November 23rd

Army troops were sent to Cripple Creek, Colorado to put down a rebellion by striking coal miners. 600 union members were thrown into a military bullpen and held for weeks without charges. When a lawyer arrived with a writ of habeas corpus, General Bell, who led the repression, responded “Habeas corpus, hell! We’ll give ‘em … Read more Today in Labor History November 23rd

Today in Labor History November 22nd

The district president of the American Federation of Labor and two other white men were shot and killed in Bogalusa, Louisiana as they attempted to assist an African-American organizer working to unionize African-American workers at the Great Southern Lumber Co. – 1919 Support us on Patreon at patreon.com/voicesoflabor The post Today in Labor History November … Read more Today in Labor History November 22nd

Today in Labor History November 21st

Alexander Berkman was born on this date in Vilna, Russia (Lithuania). One-time lover and life-long comrade of Emma Goldman, Berkman wrote Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist, after serving time for attempting to murder Henry Clay Frick, architect of the massacre of striking Homestead/Carnegie Steel workers. – 1870 The Columbine Mine massacre, sometimes called the Columbine massacre, … Read more Today in Labor History November 21st

Today in Labor History November 20th

First use of the term “scab,” by Albany Typographical Society. – 1816 Norman Thomas was born on this day. Thomas was a Presbyterian minister who achieved fame as a socialist, pacifist, and six-time presidential candidate for the Socialist Party of America. – 1884 The time clock was invented by Willard Bundy, a jeweler in Auburn, … Read more Today in Labor History November 20th